About Natural Dyes A natural dye is anything that is derived directly from the natural world that can be used to color a textile. Since the dawn of civilization, humans have been finding ways to derive color from the natural world using plants, roots, flowers, berries and even insects. We have seen a resurgence in interest and implementation of natural dyes recently, concurrent with an ever more disconnected and tech-centric world. Dyeing with natural substances is a fun way to reconnect and interact with textiles and the natural world. The above photo was taken when Earthen Warrior founder went to learn about traditional natural dye techniques from Zapotec weavers and dyers in Teotilan del Valle, Oaxaca, Mexico.

About Natural Dyes

A natural dye is anything that is derived directly from the natural world that can be used to color a textile. Since the dawn of civilization, humans have been finding ways to derive color from the natural world using plants, roots, flowers, berries and even insects. We have seen a resurgence in interest and implementation of natural dyes recently, concurrent with an ever more disconnected and tech-centric world. Dyeing with natural substances is a fun way to reconnect and interact with textiles and the natural world. The above photo was taken when Earthen Warrior founder went to learn about traditional natural dye techniques from Zapotec weavers and dyers in Teotilan del Valle, Oaxaca, Mexico.

About The Use of Herbs in Textile Preparation Little to no research has been done about the health effects of wearing chemically-sprayed cotton, chemical dyes and petroleum-based polyester on our skin (the largest organ of our body) all day and night. Earthen Warrior endeavors to create an option for those who wish to cocoon their  bodies in health-enhancing textiles. 

About The Use of Herbs in Textile Preparation

Little to no research has been done about the health effects of wearing chemically-sprayed cotton, chemical dyes and petroleum-based polyester on our skin (the largest organ of our body) all day and night. Earthen Warrior endeavors to create an option for those who wish to cocoon their  bodies in health-enhancing textiles. 

Pink - Raspberry Pigment Raspberry dye is easy to make and creates a beautiful light blush pink color. Raspberries contain strong antioxidants such as Vitamin C, quercetin and gallic acid that fight against cancer, heart and circulatory disease and age-related decline. They are high in ellagic acid, a known chemopreventative, and have been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties which can soothe the skin.

Pink - Raspberry Pigment

Raspberry dye is easy to make and creates a beautiful light blush pink color. Raspberries contain strong antioxidants such as Vitamin C, quercetin and gallic acid that fight against cancer, heart and circulatory disease and age-related decline. They are high in ellagic acid, a known chemopreventative, and have been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties which can soothe the skin.

Yellow - Turmeric Turmeric has been used for thousands of years as a medicinal preparation and a preservative and coloring agent in foods. Curcumin was isolated as the major yellow pigment in turmeric; chemically diferulomethane, and has a polyphenolic molecular structure. This polyphenol contains anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties which can aid in skin repair, in addition to many other health benefits when taken internally.

Yellow - Turmeric

Turmeric has been used for thousands of years as a medicinal preparation and a preservative and coloring agent in foods. Curcumin was isolated as the major yellow pigment in turmeric; chemically diferulomethane, and has a polyphenolic molecular structure. This polyphenol contains anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties which can aid in skin repair, in addition to many other health benefits when taken internally.

 
Yellow - Calendula The bright yellow/orange flowers give off a slightly honey aroma and contain high levels of antioxidants in the form of cartenoids and flavonoids. Calendula contains both lutein and beta-carotene, which the body absorbs and converts into vitamin A. Additionally, the flower heads are rich in oxygenated oils like monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. This herb been used medicinally since at least the 12th century and its anti-inflammatory properties soothe the skin and accelerate healing from cuts, bruises, acne and insect bites.  It was originally called calendula by the Romans, who realized the plant bloomed on the first day of each month (calends). It was a symbol of happiness in Roman gardens and also provided a continuous supply of flowers and tender leaves — so it was used regularly for cooking and medicine.

Yellow - Calendula

The bright yellow/orange flowers give off a slightly honey aroma and contain high levels of antioxidants in the form of cartenoids and flavonoids. Calendula contains both lutein and beta-carotene, which the body absorbs and converts into vitamin A. Additionally, the flower heads are rich in oxygenated oils like monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. This herb been used medicinally since at least the 12th century and its anti-inflammatory properties soothe the skin and accelerate healing from cuts, bruises, acne and insect bites.  It was originally called calendula by the Romans, who realized the plant bloomed on the first day of each month (calends). It was a symbol of happiness in Roman gardens and also provided a continuous supply of flowers and tender leaves — so it was used regularly for cooking and medicine.

Green - Pomegranate Skins Pomegranate skins will yield an earthy army green color. 

Green - Pomegranate Skins

Pomegranate skins will yield an earthy army green color. 

Blue - Indigo Indigo dye comes from the leaf of the Indigo plant, and has been used to dye textiles from Japan to Peru to India  for centuries. Its importance in history rivals that of the Spice Route as it was  a rare and coveted commodity. It is unique from all other natural dyes for its color and the process by which the dye is prepared. 

Blue - Indigo

Indigo dye comes from the leaf of the Indigo plant, and has been used to dye textiles from Japan to Peru to India  for centuries. Its importance in history rivals that of the Spice Route as it was  a rare and coveted commodity. It is unique from all other natural dyes for its color and the process by which the dye is prepared.